Blog: Commentary from the den of a pulp super-fan

Fanzine focus: Pulp Adventures #21

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, August 3, 2016 in Cthulhu Mythos, Detective Pulps, Fanzines, H.P. Lovecraft, New Pulp, Reprints, Sherlock Holmes
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

'Pulp Adventures' #21Pulp Adventures #21 (Spring 2016) is the seventh issue of the new version from Bold Venture Press.

Once again we get a collection of classic and New Pulp fiction (with some notes), all under a Norman Saunders cover (a detective one). And do we get some goodies this time!

In my view, this blend of new and old pulp fiction (with occasional pre-pulp and post-pulp) that doesn’t focus on one pulp genre — we get horror, science fiction, crime & detective, railroading, and pulp hero in this one — makes this one of the best pulp fiction fanzines coming out now. You might not like everything that appears in an issue, but I know you will like something.

The issue kicks off with Ron Fortier providing a Brother Bones tale: “The Hideout.” His Undead Avenger has appeared in several short stories and a couple of novels. And soon a roleplaying game and a movie!  Sadly, I have to admit that Brother Bones is probably the only major New Pulp Hero that I haven’t read.

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More new Green Lama: ‘Crimson Circle’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, December 23, 2015 in Cthulhu Mythos, Green Lama, Moonstone, New Pulp, Pulps, Review
Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

More new Green Lama: ‘Crimson Circle’

"The Green Lama: Crimson Circle"We have been getting new Green Lama stories from Moonstone under the authorship of Adam Lance Garcia, and now finally the long-promised novel, Crimson Circle.

Created for the Munsey pulps, The Green Lama was really American Jethro Dumont. He had traveled to Tibet, and was a real Buddhist lama, though he disguised himself as the Rev. Dr. Pali and the Green Lama. With a small group of associates, he fought crime.

Written by Kendal Foster Crossen under the pen-name Richard Foster, the series lasted for 14 pulp novels. Foster was able to keep the rights to the character, and also wrote the comic-book series at Prize Comics, and with his own comic-book company, Spark, published a Green Lama title. The comic-book versions made him more of a superhero who could fly.

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The cosmic horror of H.P. Lovecraft

Posted by at 10:00 am Monday, June 1, 2015 in Cthulhu Mythos, H.P. Lovecraft, Pulps
Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

The cosmic horror of H.P. Lovecraft
H.P. Lovecraft

H.P. Lovecraft

As has too often been the case, many pulp writers were ignored or overlooked during their lifetimes, only to become massively popular and well read after their demise. An example of this is Howard Philips Lovecraft (1890-1937) who toiled in relative obscurity writing for the pulps. Fortunately one fans worked to make his writings available, and now his works are widely available.

Lovecraft has influenced several generations of horror writers such that most recognize the term “Lovecraftian” to describe similar works or have heard of the “Cthulhu Mythos.”

As a young science-fiction fan I often also watched horror movies, many times because many horror movies were science-fiction films to a degree, especially with the idea of “creature features.” I watched the Universal monster movies — featuring Dracula, Frankenstein, the Wolf Man, the Mummy, et al — and all the rest from the ’30s, ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s.

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Pulp comics: Hellboy

Posted by at 10:00 am Friday, February 20, 2015 in Comics, Cthulhu Mythos, H.P. Lovecraft, Occult Detective, Review
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Pulp comics: Hellboy

HellboyHellboy, World’s Greatest Paranormal Investigator, is a comic-book series that in the last 20 years has spawned a whole universe of stories and series, along with animated stories and two movies.

Created by artist/writer Mike Mignola, the series has several pulp influences, including inspiration from H.P. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, and Manly Wade Wellman.

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The fantastic works of James Van Hise

Posted by at 10:00 am Friday, October 31, 2014 in Cthulhu Mythos, Doc Savage, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Fanzines, G-8, H.P. Lovecraft, Hero Pulps, Lester Dent, Non-fiction, Operator #5, Pulps, Review, Robert E. Howard, Tarzan, The Avenger, The Shadow, The Spider
Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

"Pulp Heroes of the Thirties"Probably few pulp fans today are familiar with James Van Hise. He has been a writer, editor, and publisher for many years within certain genres such as “Star Trek,” movie serials, The Green Hornet, comic books, and pulps.

He was involved at times with publishing several Edgar Rice Burroughs fanzines and did the last run of the classic comic-book fanzine Rocket’s Blast Comicscollector.

In the late 1990s, he put out several large books collecting articles and artwork on the pulps. Sadly, these are out of print and getting hard to find. I was fortunate to get them when they came out, and if you look around, they are still available.

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Pulp Comics: Atomic Robo

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, June 4, 2014 in Comics, Cthulhu Mythos, Pulps
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Atomic Robo

Atomic Robo

A comic-book character I recently looked into is Atomic Robo. I had first noticed him when I saw some pulp-inspired covers. So recently decided to check him out. I’ve really enjoyed the series, though I only get the collections.

Atomic Robo is an intelligent and self-aware robot built by Nikola Tesla in the 1920s. Many people may have heard of Tesla, but may not be aware that the inventor did pioneering work in radio and electricity, working out alternating current (AC). Thomas Edison pushed for direct current (DC), which had issues. For many years Tesla worked to create a means of broadcasting electricity, but sadly died without succeeding. Obviously, for this series, the creators took some liberties with Tesla and his life.

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