Blog: Commentary from the den of a pulp super-fan

Review: ‘Tales of the Shadowmen, Vol. 4’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, March 19, 2014 in Captain Future, Doctor Omega, French pulp, Harry Dickson, Madame Atomos, Pulps, Review, Rocambole, Sar Dubnotal, The Black Coats, The Shadow, Wold Newton Universe
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

Tales of the Shadowmen, Vol. 4“Tales of the Shadowmen: Lords of Terror” (2008) is the fourth volume of this eclectic anthology series from Black Coat Press.

It makes use of a concept of Philip José Farmer that has various fictional characters set in the same “universe,” thus able to met and interact. Don’t make the assumption that all the stories are linked. They often are not. Most are standalone, and can usually be read in any order.

What can be daunting is that this series uses characters of popular literary culture (mainly written, but sometimes film and TV), and not “high brow” characters. And the characters are taken from American, British, French, and other countries, so often if you’re not familiar with those characters, it can be confusing. Or, it could lead you to start reading the original stories of these characters, which BCP does (such as Fantomas, Nyctalope, the Black Coats, Belphegor, Judex, and many more).

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Review: ‘Tales of the Shadowmen, Vol. 1’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, November 27, 2013 in Arsene Lupin, Doctor Omega, Fantomas, French pulp, Harry Dickson, Judex, Pulps, Review, The Black Coats
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

Review: ‘Tales of the Shadowmen, Vol. 1’

Tales of the Shadowmen, Vol. 1“Tales of the Shadowmen: The Modern Babylon” (2005) is the first volume of an eclectic annual anthology series from Black Coat Press.

It makes use of a concept of Philip José Farmer that sets various fictional characters in the same “universe,” thus enabling them to meet and interact. Don’t make the assumption that all the stories are linked. They often are not. Most are standalone, can usually be read in any order.

What can be daunting is that this series uses characters of popular literary culture (mainly written, but sometimes film and TV), and not “high brow” characters. And the characters are taken from American, British, French, and other countries’ pop culture, so often if you’re not familiar with those characters, it can be confusing. Or, it could lead you to start reading the original stories of these characters, which Black Coat Press does (such as Fantomas, Nyctalope, the Black Coats, Belphegor, Judex, and many more). I have done postings on some of this and plan future ones.

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