Blog: Commentary from the den of a pulp super-fan

‘All-Star Pulp Comics’

Posted by at 10:00 am Friday, January 22, 2016 in Black Bat, Comics, Crimson Mask, Dillon, Domino Lady, Green Lama, Jim Anthony, Moon Man, Pulps, Secret Agent X, The Rook/The Peregrine
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

‘All-Star Pulp Comics’
"All-Star Pulp Comics," No. 1

“All-Star Pulp Comics,” No. 1

All-Star Pulp Comics, published by Redbud Studios, has new black-and-white comic stories of original and New Pulp characters. Three issues are out so far, available in digital and hardcopy versions. The first two issues can be obtained from IndyPlanet, while the third is on Amazon.

Redbud Studios is associated with Airship 27, so there a lot of crossover of characters. Several pulp character that Airship 27 has put out new stories of appear in these comics. Do not know which, if any of these are adaptations of those stories.

Issue number one has a cover with Green Lama and Domino Lady.

Inside we get stories of:

  • The Green Lama, by Adam Lance Garcia. The Green Lama is a shorter lived pulp character who is a Buddhist lama, and appeared in pulps and comics. As Garcia is now the official author of the character, I assume this story is considered “canon.” Here the Lama goes up against Nazis in an original story.
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More new Green Lama: ‘Crimson Circle’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, December 23, 2015 in Cthulhu Mythos, Green Lama, Moonstone, New Pulp, Pulps, Review
Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

More new Green Lama: ‘Crimson Circle’

"The Green Lama: Crimson Circle"We have been getting new Green Lama stories from Moonstone under the authorship of Adam Lance Garcia, and now finally the long-promised novel, Crimson Circle.

Created for the Munsey pulps, The Green Lama was really American Jethro Dumont. He had traveled to Tibet, and was a real Buddhist lama, though he disguised himself as the Rev. Dr. Pali and the Green Lama. With a small group of associates, he fought crime.

Written by Kendal Foster Crossen under the pen-name Richard Foster, the series lasted for 14 pulp novels. Foster was able to keep the rights to the character, and also wrote the comic-book series at Prize Comics, and with his own comic-book company, Spark, published a Green Lama title. The comic-book versions made him more of a superhero who could fly.

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The new Green Lama stories

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, October 1, 2014 in Green Lama, New Pulp, Review
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Green Lama: Mystic WarriorI have previously posted about the Green Lama. While a minor pulp character, he has been fairly successful, appearing in two separate comic-book series (including his own title), a radio show, and making new appearances in comics and prose.

Altus Press has reprinted his original pulp stories and Airship 27 was doing new stories, with Adam Lance Garcia in the lead, which I’ve covered in prior postings. It appeared that the character was in the public domain (in fact Dynamite Comics made that claim about their use of one of the comic-book versions). But it seems that the character was copyrighted by his creator, and his family still held the rights. So further new stories stalled until things were worked out.

Well, it appears that they are cleared, as we are now seeing new stories by Garcia, as well as Airship 27.

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A look at the Munsey pulp heroes

Posted by at 10:00 am Monday, January 20, 2014 in Green Lama, Munsey, Publishers, Pulps, Zorro
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

In the next in this series of articles, I take an overview of one of the major pulp publishers and their pulp heroes: the Frank Munsey Co.

Frank Munsey

Frank Munsey

Frank Munsey is very important to the pulp field because he created the idea of pulp magazines: inexpensive all-fiction magazines published on cheap pulp paper. The first pulp magazine is considered The Argosy. Other early pulps his company published would include Munsey Magazine, All-Story Magazine, Cavalier and others.

It was in Munsey’s magazines that characters like Tarzan, Zorro, Semi-Dual, The Mongoose, The Park Avenue Hunt Club, and others were published. Munsey passed away in 1925, but the company continued until they sold out to Popular Publications in 1942 which continued several of their magazines.

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Pulp comics: the golden age

Posted by at 10:00 am Friday, May 17, 2013 in Ace, Black Bat, Comics, Doc Savage, Green Lama, Hero Pulps, Pulps, Street & Smith, The Avenger, The Shadow, Thrilling
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

Green Lama comics (May 1945)In a prior posting, I covered the connection between pulp publishers and comic book publishers.

This time, I’ll delve further into comic book versions of pulp heroes. This post, the first of a two-part series, looks at the comic book versions published during the original hero pulp period (1930s-50s). The second article will look at the various adaptions of pulp heroes into comics, along with original pulp hero comic book characters that also came out.

The pulp hero period basically ran from 1931 (with the debut of The Shadow) until 1953 with the demise of the pulp heroes and the ending of the last pulp heroes The Black Bat and The Phantom Detective. This more or less corresponds with the Golden Age of comic books, which lasted from the beginning of comic books in the 1930s to the early 1950s.

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Om! Ma-ni pad-me Hum! The Green Lama

Posted by at 10:30 am Monday, April 22, 2013 in Green Lama, Hero Pulps
Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

The Green Lama

The Green Lama

Few pulp heroes were able during the classic period to make the transition from the pulp magazines to other medium such as movies/movie serials, radio, comics books, or comic strips. And even fewer were able to appear in multiple media.

One of the few who did was The Green Lama. Unusual, because he was published by a small company, and more unusual, all his non-pulp appearances were under the aegis of his creator, who was somehow able to maintain ownership of the character. He appeared in pulps, comics books and radio. There was apparently talk about doing a TV show!

The Green Lama appeared during what pulp historian Will Murray calls the “third wave” of pulp heroes. More colorful than heroes in the previous waves, the “third wave” pulp heroes would be a better able to compete against the new comic book heroes.

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