Blog: Commentary from the den of a pulp super-fan

A closer look at The Moon Man

Posted by at 10:00 am Monday, February 8, 2016 in Ace, Hero Pulps, Moon Man, Review
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

A closer look at The Moon Man
The Moon Man gets the drop on a bad guy in "Silver Death" ("Ten Detective Aces," January 1934)

The Moon Man gets the drop on a bad guy in “Silver Death” (Ten Detective Aces, January 1934)

One of the more different pulp heroes is Ace Magazines’ Moon Man. Written by Frederick C. Davis, he appeared in Ace’s anthology title Ten Detective Aces from 1933 to 1937 for a total of 38 stories. The same number as Wade Hammond, who also appeared in that pulp, but fewer than Secret Agent X, who had 41 stories.

The Moon Man was really Det. Sgt. Stephen Thatcher, son of Great City’s Police Chief, Peter Thatcher. As the Moon Man he wore a globe of Argus glass (one-way mirrored glass) that gave the appearance of the moon, hence his name.

Not really a vigilante, the Moon Man was more a Robin Hood-like character, who took from the unjust rich and gave to the poor of Great City. In this he was aided by former boxer Ned “Angel” Dargan.

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‘All-Star Pulp Comics’

Posted by at 10:00 am Friday, January 22, 2016 in Black Bat, Comics, Crimson Mask, Dillon, Domino Lady, Green Lama, Jim Anthony, Moon Man, Pulps, Secret Agent X, The Rook/The Peregrine
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

‘All-Star Pulp Comics’
"All-Star Pulp Comics," No. 1

“All-Star Pulp Comics,” No. 1

All-Star Pulp Comics, published by Redbud Studios, has new black-and-white comic stories of original and New Pulp characters. Three issues are out so far, available in digital and hardcopy versions. The first two issues can be obtained from IndyPlanet, while the third is on Amazon.

Redbud Studios is associated with Airship 27, so there a lot of crossover of characters. Several pulp character that Airship 27 has put out new stories of appear in these comics. Do not know which, if any of these are adaptations of those stories.

Issue number one has a cover with Green Lama and Domino Lady.

Inside we get stories of:

  • The Green Lama, by Adam Lance Garcia. The Green Lama is a shorter lived pulp character who is a Buddhist lama, and appeared in pulps and comics. As Garcia is now the official author of the character, I assume this story is considered “canon.” Here the Lama goes up against Nazis in an original story.
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A look at the Ace pulp heroes

Posted by at 10:00 am Monday, December 23, 2013 in Ace, Captain Hazzard, Comics, Moon Man, Publishers, Secret Agent X
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

A.A. Wyn

A.A. Wyn

In the next in this series of articles, I take an overview of one of the major pulp publishers and their pulp heroes: Ace Magazines.

Established in 1928 by Harold Hersey as Magazine Publishers, the company was taken over by A.A. Wyn in 1929. Keeping the name, the line was labeled Ace Magazines and used an ace of spades as a logo. Periodical House was another company name used, so the line might be referred to as Magazine Publishers, Periodical House or Ace.

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Review: ‘The Good, The Bad, and the Unknown’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, December 11, 2013 in Doctor Satan, Hero Pulps, Moon Man, New Pulp, Review, Secret Agent X
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Review: ‘The Good, The Bad, and the Unknown’

The Good, the Bad, and the Unknown“The Good, the Bad, and the Unknown” is an interesting collection.

I originally thought it a single novel using three classic characters: Moon Man, Doctor Satan and Secret Agent X. Instead, it’s a collection: a novel-length tale of the Moon Man, followed by short stories of Doctor Satan and Secret Agent X. All written by Michael Frigon, and published by Wild Cat Books.

For those not aware, here is a quick run down of these three characters.

The Moon Man was a secondary pulp hero, published in about 40 stories in Ace Magazines’ Ten Detective Aces in the mid-1930s. He is different from most pulp heroes, being more of a Robin Hood character: stealing from the greedy rich, to distribute to the poor. And so is thought a criminal. He is really police detective Steve Thatcher, son of the Great City Chief of Police, and in love with the daughter of his boss, the chief of detectives. His fiance is the only one who knows he’s the Moon Man (so named, because of the glass globe helmet he wears, which is really a one-way mirror). Helping him is ex-boxer Ned “Angel” Dugan, who doesn’t know his identity, but who helps him distribute the money he steals. Only a few original stories have been reprinted, though there is a complete (but expensive) collection of all his stories. So I’ve never read an original Moon Man story, only new stories using him.

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Meet the Moon Man

Posted by at 10:00 am Thursday, September 5, 2013 in Ace, Hero Pulps, Moon Man, New Pulp, Review
Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

The Compleat Adventures of the Moon ManThe Moon Man is one of the most unusual pulp heroes.

Sometimes called the “Robin Hood of the Pulps,” he is really Det. Sgt. Stephen Thatcher, who is the son of Police Chief Peter Thatcher. Upset by the injustice he sees in Great City during the Depression, Stephen Thatcher assumes the role of the vigilante thief the Moon Man by disguising his features beneath a one–way Argus glass globe.

Helped by his loyal aide, former boxer Ned “Angel” Dargan and his fiance, Sue McEwen, the daughter of the man sworn to capture him, his own boss, Lt. Det. Gil McEwen, he makes sure that the ill gotten money is distributed to those in need.

Created by pulp author Frederick C. Davis, the Moon Man’s exploits appeared in the pages of Ten Detective Aces, published by Ace, for 38 stories from 1933–37.

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Review: ‘Tales of Masks & Mayhem,’ Vol. II

Posted by at 10:00 am Thursday, August 29, 2013 in Black Bat, Hero Pulps, Moon Man, New Pulp, Pulps, Review
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Tales of Masks & Mayhem, Vol. 2“Tales of Masks and Mayhem” Vol. II is the second of four collections continuing from Tom Johnson‘s Fading Shadow’s zines, such as Double Danger Tales and Classic Pulp Fiction Stories (which ran some original pulp heroes until DDT was created and they were moved there), and highlights New Pulp hero stories, featuring both originals and public domain characters.

This collection includes these stories:

• “First Flight,” by K.G. McAbee and Johnson. It features Shadowhawke, an original, a character like The Shadow but set during the ’20s. There are some interesting, original elements with this character. As far as I know, no other stories with this character have been done. Reprinted from DDT #46.

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