Blog: Commentary from the den of a pulp super-fan

Review: ‘Day of the Destroyers’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, August 12, 2015 in Hero Pulps, Moonstone, New Pulp, Operator #5, Review
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Review: ‘Day of the Destroyers’

"Day of the Destroyers"“Day of the Destroyers” is a New Pulp linked anthology from Moonstone Books. It stars Jimmy Flint, Agent X-11 of the Intelligence Service Command as he fights against a conspiracy by the Medusa Council to take over the United States.

Jimmy Flint is your typical spy/secret agent character from the pulps, fighting a secret war against enemies, foreign and domestic, of the U.S. A veteran of WWI, a master of various forms of unarmed combat, as well as having various weapons to help him, including a special gun, various items described as pens, and others. He answers to his boss, Number 6, and is aided by his uncle Jack Flint, who is a retired spy known as Falcon-7 who has gathered other former spies as the “Shadow Service.” Later in the series he gains a young sidekick. (However, one writer flubbed and referred to Jimmie as “Jack” in his story.)

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The fantastic works of James Van Hise

Posted by at 10:00 am Friday, October 31, 2014 in Cthulhu Mythos, Doc Savage, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Fanzines, G-8, H.P. Lovecraft, Hero Pulps, Lester Dent, Non-fiction, Operator #5, Pulps, Review, Robert E. Howard, Tarzan, The Avenger, The Shadow, The Spider
Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

"Pulp Heroes of the Thirties"Probably few pulp fans today are familiar with James Van Hise. He has been a writer, editor, and publisher for many years within certain genres such as “Star Trek,” movie serials, The Green Hornet, comic books, and pulps.

He was involved at times with publishing several Edgar Rice Burroughs fanzines and did the last run of the classic comic-book fanzine Rocket’s Blast Comicscollector.

In the late 1990s, he put out several large books collecting articles and artwork on the pulps. Sadly, these are out of print and getting hard to find. I was fortunate to get them when they came out, and if you look around, they are still available.

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Fanzine focus: ‘Windy City Pulp Stories’

Posted by at 10:00 am Friday, October 10, 2014 in Doc Savage, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Fanzines, Fu Manchu, G-8, Lester Dent, Operator #5, Popular, Pulps, References, Review, Tarzan
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

'Windy City Pulp Stories' #3Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention has been running in Chicago around April for 15 years (since 2000). Every year they have been publishing a convention booklet of articles and reprints (both fiction and non-fiction from the pulp era) titled Windy City Pulp Stories, which is a great resource.

The ones I have are trade paperback size, and the recent ones have ranged from 130 to 150 pages in length. Most are themed. Since the eighth volume they have been published by Black Dog Books, and because they use print-on-demand, these volumes are easy to get from Amazon and the like. The earlier ones are not as easy to find.

I have several volumes, and will cover what I have.

#3 (2003) Edited by Cat Jaster and Doug Ellis, this volume has several articles, bios, and some fiction. The articles include an article on Will Murray about the creation of the villain from the Doc story, “Repel.” Another article looks at the films shown at the Convention. There is an article, bio and a sample of fiction from pulpster Hugh B. Cave, and a bio and sample of fiction from Frank Robinson.

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A look at the Popular hero pulps

Posted by at 10:00 am Monday, December 2, 2013 in G-8, Hero Pulps, Operator #5, Popular, The Spider, Villain Pulps
Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

A look at the Popular hero pulps
Harry Steeger

Harry Steeger

In the next in this series of articles, I take an overview of one of the major pulp publishers and their pulp heroes: Popular Publications.

Established in 1930, Popular Publications was solely a pulp publisher. Unlike others, they never got into comic books (though it was considered) or books, nor were they part of a larger publishing conglomerate. Popular was established by Harry Steeger, who had been an editor at Dell and had started some previous short-lived publications.

Popular was notable for their weird menace pulp stories, a genre they created, and this element affected all their pulp heroes to different levels. Depending on how you look at them, they are either the second or third most successful pulp publishers, and supposedly their pulps outsold Street & Smith’s so maybe they could be considered number one. This also enabled them to buy out other pulp publishers (like Munsey, and later picking up many of Street & Smith’s titles when they stopped publishing pulps). And they are one of the few hero pulp publishers that did several villain pulps. Finally, they are notable for publishing what most consider the last original pulp hero, Captain Zero.

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