Blog: Commentary from the den of a pulp super-fan

‘Vic Challenger #6: Event’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, December 13, 2017 in Edgar Rice Burroughs, New Pulp, Pulps, Review
Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

‘Vic Challenger #6: Event’

'Vic Challenger #6: Event'I have previously posted about the Vic Challenger series, in particular numbers 1, 2, and 5. Set in the 1920s, the series stars young Victoria Custer who discovers she is the reincarnation of a cave girl, Nat-ul, born and died 100,000 years ago.

Using the name “Vic Challenger,” she works as a travel writer (and adventurer) while looking for her soul mate from 100,000 years ago whom she thinks is also reincarnated. But in her travels, she gets into various dangers, and her past life as a cave girl warrior helps her out.

The character actually comes from Edgar Rice BurroughsThe Eternal Lover (later renamed The Eternal Savage). As the Burroughs novel is in the public domain, I am sure calling the character “Vic Challenger” makes it easier to copyright this different take on the character.

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Review: ‘The Adventures of Lazarus Gray, Vol. 7’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, December 6, 2017 in Lazarus Gray, New Pulp, Pro Se Press, Review
Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

Review: ‘The Adventures of Lazarus Gray, Vol. 7’

'The Adventures of Lazarus Gray, Vol. 7'I finally got the most recent Lazarus Gray book, volume seven, from Barry Reese. Unlike past books, this one is a novel. And it’s a big event, as it brings together all the members of Assistance Unlimited to deal with a persistent foe.

Lazarus Gray is a New Pulp character from writer Reese (The Peregrine, Gravedigger, and other works). Gray is sort of inspired by the classic pulp hero The Avenger.

Gray has setup a group similar to The Avenger’s called Assistance Unlimited. He is located in a fictional town called Sovereign City (created by Pro Se Press publisher Tommy Hancock), and is part of the larger Sovereign City Project. He is also set in the same universe as Barry’s other characters, so has crossed over with them.

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The last of Gees

Posted by at 10:00 am Monday, November 6, 2017 in English Pulp, Occult Detective, Review
Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

The last of Gees

'Her Ways Are Death'I have previously posted on a new (to me) occult detective I discovered: Gees, real name Gregory George Gordon Green. Created by British author and editor Charles Henry Cannell (1882-1947) who may be better known by one of his pseudonyms, E. Charles Vivian, these novels appeared under his Jack Mann pseudonym.

There are eight novels in the series, and I have read and reviewed the first five. Recently I got the last three: The Ninth Life, The Glass Too Many, and Her Ways Are Death. All originally appeared, so I am told, in 1939 and ’40. All eight are available from Ramble House in paperback, but you need to look on both Amazon and Lulu. For those wanting a pulp connection, The Ninth Life was serialized in The Argosy in 1939, then reprinted in A. Merritt’s Fantasy Magazine in 1950. Her Ways Are Death was reprinted (and cover featured) in an issue of Famous Fantastic Mysteries in 1952.

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The return of Jack West Jr.

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, November 1, 2017 in Review, Techno-Thriller
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

The return of Jack West Jr.

"The Six Sacred Stones"I have previously posted on the techno-thriller heroes of Australian author Matthew Reilly: Jack West Jr. and Shane Schofield (aka Scarecrow). I had hoped to see a new novel with one of them, and now we have a new Jack West Jr. novel.

Reilly’s works are marked by two elements: dialing up the action to level 11 at times, and having the hero and associates navigating an area that is similar to a “platform” computer game.

Jack is an former Australian soldier now teamed up with a diverse group trying to stop ancient threats to the world. Jack has a cybernetic hand, replacing one he lost saving the life of a young girl, Lily, who is vital to their missions. The hand was built by Jack’s mentor, Professor Maximilian Epper, “Wizard.”

Against them are various rogue elements of certain powerful nations. Their foes include his own father, a U.S. general, and several world leaders who expect to come out on top once the threats are over. His father is a real piece of work, as is his stepbrother who is allied with his father.

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‘Pulp Adventures’ #26

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, October 25, 2017 in Adventure Pulps, Detective Pulps, Fanzines, H.P. Lovecraft, New Pulp, Pulps, Reprints, Review, Weird Fiction
Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

‘Pulp Adventures’ #26

'Pulp Adventures' #26Bold Ventures Press is back with another new issue of Pulp Adventures, #26 for the Summer of 2017.  And we get another Norman Saunders cover.  Was wondering if he’s return.

As always, a mix of old and new pulp in a wide range of genres:  mystery, western, horror, adventure, pulp hero and more.  Some stories are almost a 100 years old!!

From classic pulp we get the following:

“The Doting Burglar” by Ben Hecht is a fairly interesting tale that appeared way back in 1917 in All Story Weekly.  The author, whom we learn more from the blurb is as interesting.  He was a journalist and writer from the 1920s until he passed in 1964.  Like many pulp writers he also wrote plays and film scripts, and even lyrics.  He got 6 Academy Award nominations.

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‘Blood ‘n’ Thunder Presents #3: Fighting Crime One Dime at a Time’

Posted by at 10:00 am Wednesday, October 18, 2017 in Dime Novels, Non-fiction, Pulps, References, Reprints, Review, The Shadow
Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

‘Blood ‘n’ Thunder Presents #3: Fighting Crime One Dime at a Time’

Fighting Crime One Dime at a TimeEd Hulse and his Murania Press have put out a third Blood ‘n’ Thunder Presents volume, this time focused on the pulp heroes: Fighting Crime One Dime at a Time.

(And, yes, there is a second volume in the series, The Penny-a-Word Brigade. I just haven’t gotten that one, and when I do I’ll post a review.)

As a pulp-hero fan, I recommend this volume, which has a whole set of articles on pulp heroes, all reprinted from previous issues of Blood ‘n’ Thunder. We also get a couple of pulp-hero comic stories from the golden age. Now, these are not your standard overview articles (though there are a couple of those). Several delve into some interesting topics, some have helped me with some of my postings here, and all are written by several pulp historians.

We get articles on many of the major heroes, and a couple of obscure ones.

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